My Philosophy In Life Short Essay On Global Warming

I have been lucky enough to live past 80, and the 15 years allotted to me beyond Hume’s three score and five have been equally rich in work and love. In that time, I have published five books and completed an autobiography (rather longer than Hume’s few pages) to be published this spring; I have several other books nearly finished.

Hume continued, “I am ... a man of mild dispositions, of command of temper, of an open, social, and cheerful humour, capable of attachment, but little susceptible of enmity, and of great moderation in all my passions.”

Here I depart from Hume. While I have enjoyed loving relationships and friendships and have no real enmities, I cannot say (nor would anyone who knows me say) that I am a man of mild dispositions. On the contrary, I am a man of vehement disposition, with violent enthusiasms, and extreme immoderation in all my passions.

And yet, one line from Hume’s essay strikes me as especially true: “It is difficult,” he wrote, “to be more detached from life than I am at present.”

Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts. This does not mean I am finished with life.

On the contrary, I feel intensely alive, and I want and hope in the time that remains to deepen my friendships, to say farewell to those I love, to write more, to travel if I have the strength, to achieve new levels of understanding and insight.

This will involve audacity, clarity and plain speaking; trying to straighten my accounts with the world. But there will be time, too, for some fun (and even some silliness, as well).

I feel a sudden clear focus and perspective. There is no time for anything inessential. I must focus on myself, my work and my friends. I shall no longer look at “NewsHour” every night. I shall no longer pay any attention to politics or arguments about .

This is not indifference but detachment — I still care deeply about the , about global warming, about growing inequality, but these are no longer my business; they belong to the future. I rejoice when I meet gifted young people — even the one who biopsied and diagnosed my metastases. I feel the future is in good hands.

I have been increasingly conscious, for the last 10 years or so, of deaths among my contemporaries. My generation is on the way out, and each death I have felt as an abruption, a tearing away of part of myself. There will be no one like us when we are gone, but then there is no one like anyone else, ever. When people die, they cannot be replaced. They leave holes that cannot be filled, for it is the fate — the genetic and neural fate — of every human being to be a unique individual, to find his own path, to live his own life, to die his own death.

I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved; I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read and traveled and thought and written. I have had an intercourse with the world, the special intercourse of writers and readers.

Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.

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Correction: February 26, 2015

Because of an editing error, Oliver Sacks’s Op-Ed essay last Thursday misstated the proportion of cases in which the rare eye cancer he has — ocular melanoma — metastasizes. It is around 50 percent, not 2 percent, or “only in very rare cases.” When Dr. Sacks wrote, “I am among the unlucky 2 percent,” he was referring to the particulars of his case. (The likelihood of the cancer’s metastasizing is based on factors like the size and molecular features of the tumor, the patient’s age and the amount of time since the original diagnosis.)

In the last 50 years, human activities such as excavating the earth, use of fossil fuels and greenhouse emissions have drastically altered the earth’s climate in negative ways. During this period of time, the burning of fossil fuels has released large quantities of carbon dioxide and greenhouse emissions which in turn have trapped heat in the earth’s lower atmosphere thereby affecting our global climate.

Statistics show that the ravages of global warming and its effects of climate change affects different regions in diverse ways but in total, the earth has witnessed an increase of 0.85 degree centigrade in its general temperature in the last 100 years. These statistics also point out that the increase is set to pass acceptable thresholds by 2030. And if this occurs, it will lead to dire consequences on the earth’s climate and human health in the long run. Therefore, the responsibility of educating the world’s population on the dangers of global warming falls on your shoulders. In order to do so, here are 20 short essay topics on global warming students should consider working on to divert our collective attention to this ticking time bomb.

The 20 short essay topics on global warming:

  1. Discussing the Impact of Climate Change on Human Health
  2. Understanding Global Warming, its Relation to Climate Change and Health Effects
  3. Global Warming Driving Extreme Heating in Urban Areas
  4. Natural Disasters, Varying Rainfall Patterns and Your Health
  5. Reducing Wildfires through the Study and Management of Global Warming
  6. Ocean Acidification and its Effects on the World’s Habitat
  7. Measuring the Health Effects of Global Warming on the Earth’s Population
  8. Global Warming, Natural Disasters and the Correlation with Mental Illness
  9. Global Warming and Excessive Climate Change; A Risk to Human Lives
  10. Investigating Warmer Temperatures and its Support for Allergy-Related Diseases
  11. Investigating Climate Change Effects on the Quality of Life in Urban and Rural Areas
  12. Effects of Global Warming on Health Care
  13. Reducing the Effects of Global Warming on Human Health
  14. How Global Warming Works and its Dangers to Human Health
  15. Climate Change Droughts and Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa
  16. Global Warming and its Negative Effects on Agriculture and Human Well-being
  17. Climate change, Irregular Weather Patterns and the Food Chain
  18. The Health Risks Associated with Greenhouse Emissions and Global Warming
  19. Global Warming and Its Effects on Air Quality in Urban Communities
  20. Climate Change and the Ever-Disappearing Rainforest

The above short essay topics on global warming covers the various far reaching effects of climate change on the earth’s ecosystem. Therefore, if you are interested in studying nature or natural disasters, you can simply choose a topic that focuses on how global warming affects your area of study and the individuals residing in these regions.

In the next section of this article, a topic will be chose and a short essay will be written around it to provide you with some direction on drafting essays on global warming. It is important to note that this article was inspired by the first article — 10 facts on global warming and human health in world climate change — in this three part series.

Sample Short Essay: How Global Warming Works and Its Dangers to Human Health

Over the last two decades, scientist have been involved in a race to prove that the phenomenon known as global warming exists and could drastically affect human life in the coming decades. The need to offer hard facts stemmed from the criticism the environmental community has received from politicians and naysayers who believe that an ulterior motive is integrated into the message of cleaning up the environment. Therefore, I intend to use this essay to discuss the meaning of global warming and how it will affect human life in the near future.

In simple terms, global warming is the increase of the earth’s average surface temperature due to the effect of greenhouse gasses such as carbon dioxide, which in turn trap heat in the earth’s atmosphere. In an ideal situation or ecosystem, these heat created by the use of fossil fuels and deforestation would escape from the earth’s surface but the amount of greenhouse vapors the earth currently produces outweighs the earth’s natural filters.

As earlier stated, global warming is caused by carbon dioxide and greenhouse emission produced in large quantities by human activities. These activities include the burning of fossil fuel in our vehicles, industries and homes, and the massive deforestation occurring in rural areas to provide building materials, paper and fuel for human consumption.

This abuse of the earth’s resources has led to increased emission rates, trapped heat and an overall increase in the earth’s temperature by 0.85 degree centigrade in the 21st century. The increase in temperature also has its adverse effects on the world’s climate and has led to irregular weather conditions worldwide. Due to climate change, rivers and oceans now overflow their banks leading to flooding of farms which are the sources of food and revenue for rural communities.

The result has been widespread malnutrition, mosquito population growth, and increase in malaria-related deaths and the spread of waterborne diseases which drastically reduces the quality of life in rural areas. Urban areas are also not left out, as irregular weather conditions have led to heat waves which have been responsible for approximately 30,000 deaths on a yearly basis. Wildfires are another by-product of a changing climate and they have led to displacements, disillusionment and anxiety among people who have been caught up in their part.

Although global warming affects the people of earth in diverse ways, everyone still suffers its ravages. Studies show that if the trend in which fossil fuels are being consumed continues, the year 2030 will witness unprecedented climate irregularities which could lead to approximately 250,000 deaths. Therefore, the task of saving lives falls on our shoulders and the public can be sensitized and better educated once we all agree that global warming and the issues it raises are important.

This is the end of the second article in this three-part series and for those interested on perfecting their essay writing skills, do not forget to read the last article covering the techniques of writing short essays on global warming and human health in world climate change.

References:
Morhadt, J. (2009). Ecological Consequences of Global Climate Change.
Fernando, H & Klaic, Z. (2012). National Security and Human Health Implications of Climate Change.
Pool, R. (2008). The Nexus of Biofuels, Climate Change and Human Health.
WHO Fact Sheet. (2016). Climate Change and Health. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs266/en/
National Centre for Science Education Journal. (2010). How will Climate Change Affect the World and Society. https://ncse.com/library-resource/how-will-climate-change-affect-world-society
Anthony, M. (2013). Globalization, Climate Change and Human Health. http://wphna.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/13-04-NEJM-McMichael-Global-Change.pdf
Haines, A., & Smith, R. (2009). Public Health Benefits of Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Overview and Implications for Policy Makers, 14:2-4.

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